Read the current Defeat Diabetes® E-Lerts™ Newsletter

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.

 
 
 
     
    
      
       
Defeat Diabetes
Foundation
150 153rd Ave,
Suite 300

Madeira Beach, FL 33708
  

Depression Derails Diabetics' Self-care

Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Dr. Elizabeth H. B. Lin from the Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington stated, that "major depression is common among diabetes patients, affecting more than one in eight diabetes patients."
"Depressed patients with diabetes are more likely to be obese, have poorly controlled diabetes, suffer more complications such as heart disease, and use more medical services than non-depressed patients," she said.

Lin and her colleagues assessed diabetes self-care, adherence to medication, and use of preventive services among 4463 people with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a large health maintenance organization.
Twelve percent of the diabetic patients in this study had major depression. Depression affected more women (14 percent) than men (10 percent).

Compared with patients without depression, depressed patients ate less fruit and vegetables and more fat, the report indicates, and depressed patients were significantly less likely to exercise. They also showed less adherence to their prescribed regimens, the researchers note.

In contrast, depressed and non-depressed patients did not differ in frequency of blood glucose self-monitoring, foot checks for ulcers or infections, or the use of diabetes monitoring and preventive services.

"Disease management of common chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure and diabetes, has had some success in improving clinical outcomes," Lin said. "But depression is a missing link in most disease management programs."

 

Dr. Elizabeth H. B. Lin from the Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington stated, that "major depression is common among diabetes patients, affecting more than one in eight diabetes patients."
"Depressed patients with diabetes are more likely to be obese, have poorly controlled diabetes, suffer more complications such as heart disease, and use more medical services than non-depressed patients," she said.

Lin and her colleagues assessed diabetes self-care, adherence to medication, and use of preventive services among 4463 people with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a large health maintenance organization.
Twelve percent of the diabetic patients in this study had major depression. Depression affected more women (14 percent) than men (10 percent).

Compared with patients without depression, depressed patients ate less fruit and vegetables and more fat, the report indicates, and depressed patients were significantly less likely to exercise. They also showed less adherence to their prescribed regimens, the researchers note.

In contrast, depressed and non-depressed patients did not differ in frequency of blood glucose self-monitoring, foot checks for ulcers or infections, or the use of diabetes monitoring and preventive services.

"Disease management of common chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure and diabetes, has had some success in improving clinical outcomes," Lin said. "But depression is a missing link in most disease management programs."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Diabetes In Control.com:

 
 
 
 
 
Join us on Facebook
 
 
 

Send your unopened, unexpired diabetes testing supplies to:

Defeat Diabetes Foundation
150 153rd Ave, Suite 300
Madeira Beach, FL 33708

 

DDF advertisement
 

 Friendly Banner
 


Friendly Banner
 
 
 
Analyze nutrition content by portion
DDF advertisement