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Mixing Long and Short Acting Insulins in Same Syringe Does Not Compromise Long-Term Glycemic Control

Posted: Friday, June 09, 2006

Mixing Lantus and rapid-acting insulins as Humalog or Novolog does not compromise glycemic control.

Similar to what has been shown in short-term studies, rapid-acting insulin analogues (RAI) can be mixed with insulin glargine without compromising long-term glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes, new research shows.

The ability to give RAIs and insulin glargine in the same syringe has the potential to decrease the number of daily injections and increase use of insulin glargine, lead author Dr. Rosanna Fiallo-Scharer, from the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues note.

As reported in the Journal of Pediatrics for April, the researchers compared glycemic control in 55 children who mixed insulin glargine and a RAI with that seen in 55 children who took separate injections.

The ability to give rapid-acting insulin analogues (such as Apidra, NovoRapid) and long-acting insulin glargine (Lantus) in the same syringe has the potential to decrease the number of daily injections and increase use of insulin glargine, Dr. Rosanna Fiallo-Scharer, from the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues note in the Journal of Pediatrics

The researchers compared blood sugar control in 55 children who mixed insulin glargine and a rapid-acting insulin analog with that seen in 55 children who took separate injections.

Low and high blood sugar complications were uncommon and occurred with similar frequency in each group, the report indicates.

After 6 months, HbA1c levels were nearly the same in each group, at 8.54 and 8.61. Likewise, the groups were comparable in terms of the percentages of blood glucose values that fell outside the target range.

Hypoglycemic events and diabetic ketoacidosis events were uncommon and occurred with similar frequency in each group, the report indicates.

"The findings are especially encouraging to those patients who wish to minimize the number of total daily injections because of needle fear, forgetting injections, or other injection-related issues," the researchers state.

 

Source: Diabetes In Control: J Pediatr 2006;148:481-484

 
 
 
 
 
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