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Defeat Diabetes
Foundation
150 153rd Ave,
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Madeira Beach, FL 33708
  

Report Finds Diabetes Self-Care Improves Slowly

Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2013

According to the new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. National Institutes of Health, just 14 percent of people with diabetes hit all the recommended health targets during the first decade of the 21st century.

Researchers found that between 1999 and 2010, the number of people with diabetes who achieved their blood sugar goals improved by about 8 percent. That same time period saw a nearly 12 percent improvement in the number of people meeting their blood pressure goals. And 21 percent more people lowered their LDL cholesterol (the bad type) to less than 100 milligrams per deciliter during the study time period.

Tobacco use was one area where the numbers didn't move.

Almost 19 million U.S. adults have diabetes, according to background information in the study. "Probably 95 percent or higher have type 2 diabetes," said Ali. Type 2 diabetes is considered preventable. Untreated or poorly treated diabetes can lead to serious complications, including vision problems and kidney disease.

According to the report, the primary goals for diabetes care include:

  • Hemoglobin A1C of 7 percent or less
  • Blood pressure of less than 130/80 mm Hg
  • LDL cholesterol levels below 100 milligrams per deciliter
  • No tobacco use

"The overarching theme is slow and steady improvement. Just a 1 percent improvement in hemoglobin A1C [a long-term measure of blood sugar levels] in 19 million people with diabetes is tremendous," said report author Dr. Mohammed Ali, an assistant professor of global health and epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and a consultant in the CDC's division of diabetes translation in Atlanta.

Source: http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14566&catid=53&Itemid=8, April 25, 2013, New England Journal of Medicine.

 
 
 
 
 
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